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The R-22 Phase Out & You

Are you surprised to hear that your home air conditioning system may soon be obsolete? If your air conditioner was manufactured before 2010, chances are it uses an ozone-depleting refrigerant commonly referred to as R-22. That’s bad news for the environment, and maybe for your wallet, too.

 

You see, R-22 is being phased out since it is one of numerous substances that are responsible for ozone depletion; many homeowners know R-22 as “freon.” R-22 is still available for existing systems, but you should be aware that since 2010, only a limited amount of new R-22 refrigerant is being produced to meet the needs of equipment manufactured before Dec. 31, 2009.

 

This means that the already high price will continue to rise as supplies decrease.

 

By 2020, production will be prohibited and only recovered, recycled or reclaimed supplies of R-22 will be available to service existing equipment. This means that you’ll eventually have to replace or retrofit your unit.

 

What kind of refrigerant do I have?

It’s easy to check your equipment. The type of refrigerant is often identified on a nameplate on the air conditioning unit.

 

If you can’t find the nameplate, try checking your owner’s manual. Or, if you know the manufacturer and the model number, you could call the manufacturer, or check their website.

 

What replaces R-22?

The newest refrigerant used in home air conditioning systems nowadays is called R-410A. R-410A is a refrigerant blend that does not harm the ozone layer, but it’s important to know that it can’t be used in any system not specifically designed for it.

 

Do I need to replace my system?

Any system that uses R-22 is not very efficient compared to today’s high-efficiency systems. The age of your air conditioning system, maintenance costs, and replacement costs are the factors to weigh as the R-22 phase out continues.

The best thing you can do is learn what type of refrigerant your air conditioning system uses. If it uses a refrigerant that is being phased out, you’ll want to learn about replacement and servicing options.

If it is time to upgrade or purchase new equipment, homeowners ought to consider several things: energy efficiency, performance, reliability, cost, and replacement options.

Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) is another major factor to consider in your decision. SEER is the measure of how energy efficient your system is, the higher the SEER rating, the more efficient your system will be.

 

To learn more about SEER, read SEER: The Term Every Homeowner Should Know and The Truth About SEER.

 

Three Ways to Reduce Costs:

  1. Maintenance! If there’s one thing we see all too often, its system failure due to a lack of regular, professional maintenance. Maintenance is the best thing you can do for your system. It will help keep it running in good condition, maintain your comfort levels, and keep your operating and repair costs down. Professional maintenance reduces environmental hazards as well.
  2. Repair leaks! You’ll want to make sure your service technicians repair leaks when they find them. Avoid companies and technicians that will simply “top off” a system. Not only is this bad for the environment, but it’s also bad for your wallet because it doesn’t address the underlying problem.
  3. Use Rebates! You can also take advantage of the steep rebates provided from utility companies and equipment manufacturers to replace your existing system.

 

Why not reduce your energy bills by 20%-40% with a new high efficiency R-410A system that will save you money, have fewer breakdowns, and help save the planet? Some of the best rebates around are only available through factory-authorized deals such as Sanford Temperature Control!

 

More information about rebates are available on our Rebates page, and at NHSaves.

Or you can Contact Us, or give us a call at (603) 769-3956. We look forward to hearing from you!


 

 

 

Adrian W.

Marketing Manager

 


Sources:

https://www.epa.gov/ods-phaseout/accelerated-phaseout-class-i-ozone-depleting-substances

https://www.epa.gov/ods-phaseout/purchasing-and-repairing-home-air-conditioners-or-heat-pumps

https://www.epa.gov/ods-phaseout/homeowners-and-consumers-frequently-asked-questions

http://www.hvacrbusiness.com/epa-R-22-phase-out-what-contractors-need-to-know.html

https://www.epa.gov/ods-phaseout/homeowners-and-consumers-frequently-asked-questions

https://www.epa.gov/ods-phaseout

http://www.phaseoutfacts.org/

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